Sioux Falls, South Dakota Travel

The terrain of eastern South Dakota is a sea of ​​grass-covered swells and troughs, segmented by streams and punctuated by islands of trees. The largest of these “tree islands” is the city of Sioux Falls. The Big Sioux River twists and loops through the city of more than 170,000 residents and provides it with its…

The terrain of eastern South Dakota is a sea of ​​grass-covered swells and troughs, segmented by streams and punctuated by islands of trees. The largest of these “tree islands” is the city of Sioux Falls. The Big Sioux River twists and loops through the city of more than 170,000 residents and provides it with its namesake by stairstepping down an outcropping of pink quartzite.

The friendly, active people in South Dakota's most popular city enjoy their museums, parks, art galleries, restaurants, and zoo. And the city's four colleges and five hospitals make it a regional center for education and health care. It's not surprising then that Money Magazine rates Sioux Falls among the top 10 small cities in America in terms of quality of life.

At the northwestern corner of the city, the Big Sioux River begins its loop through town. One of the parks the river passes is Sherman Park, located at 16th and Kiwanis Avenue. This facility boasts a number of attractions, most notably the Great Plains Zoo and the Delbridge Museum of Natural History. The zoo was patterned after the San Diego Zoo and contains more than 300 animals. Some of the creatures that are native to the state stay in the North American Plains Exhibit, which encompasses six acres along the banks of the Big Sioux River. Another exhibit displays ornithologist Roger Tory Peterson's favorite kind of bird – the penguin.

Complements the zoo, the nearby Delbridge Museum of Natural History houses one of the world's largest collections of mounted animals. Nearly 175 animals are displayed in this facility and arranged according to the climatic zone or ecosystem in which they lived. Attorney CJ Delbridge, for whatever the museum was named, purchased these mounted animals from a hardware store once owned by Henry Brockhouse, who legally hunted and mounted these animals in the 40's, 50's, and 60's. Delbridge donated the collection to the city on the condition that funds would be raised to construct a suitable building in which to display them. The city completed the museum in 1984.

Driving south on Kiwanis Avenue, parallel with the river, you will reach one end of the Big Sioux River Recreation Trail and Greenway at 41st Street near Oxbow Park. This bicycle trail system encircles the city. The best place to begin a trek on the bike trail is at Yankton Trail Park, located at the southern end of Western Avenue, where plenty of parking is available. From there, the trail follows the river for over 19 miles (31 km) past city parks complete with canoe launch areas, baseball diamonds, playing fields, picnic areas, and towering cottonwoods.

Going counterclockwise along the bikeway from Yankton Trail Park lies yet another riverside facility called Cherry Rock Park. A few blocks away at 713 S. Cleveland Avenue, you used to find the Jim Savage Western Art & Gift Gallery and Studio. Savage, who died in 1986, was a self-taught sculptor and painter of Western and Native American subjects. His wife, Shirley, ran the gallery for many years after his passing. Occasionally, his collection was moved to Augustana University which now has an exhibit called the Northern Plains Folk Art Continuum, which includes Savage's art. Jim's daughter, Connie Savage Thiewes, who is an accomplished artist in her own right, has created a Facebook page to track her father's artwork.

Following the river counterclockwise further, bicyclists will reach a spur off of the bike trail that leads to Fawick Park, located at 11th Street and Second Avenue. Named for Thomas Fawick, a Cleveland, Ohio, inventor, industrialist, and philanthropist, the park is home to a full-scale copy of Michelangelo's sculpture of David – one of only two copies ever made – that Fawick cave to the city. Another of his gifts is the only copy ever made of Michelangelo's likeness of Moses which adorns the campus of Augustana University at 2001 South Summit Avenue.

Situated several blocks west of Fawick Park at 11th and Phillips Streets is one of Sioux Falls best restaurants – Minerva's Restaurant. Winner of the Silver Spoon Award from The Gourmet Diners Club of America, this eatery offers Seafood, Italian, Cajun and French selections. Sioux Falls provides visitors with a wide range of other dining selections as well, from All-American fast-food to Mexican, Japanese, Cambodian, and New England fare among others.

Just before it leaves town, the Big Sioux River cascades over an outcropping of rocks and forms the waterfall thatave the city its name. The pink Sioux quartzite that is exposed at the falls and through the area ranks as some of the oldest rock in South Dakota. The hard, durable quartzite was once quarried, for it provided excellent paving and building stone. Falls Park, which surrounds this waterfall, contains the Queen Bee Mill, a grist mill, and a Light and Power Company power plant that serve as reminders of the time when the falls were harnessed for power. The power plant has been remodeled to become the Falls Overlook Cafe. The park is also home to many sculptures.

And, speaking of reminders, the history of Sioux Falls is presented at the Old Courthouse Museum at Sixth Street and Main Avenue, which was built with blocks of quartzite. Museum visitors will learn about the Woodland People, who lived in the area 1,000 years ago; they were followed by the Arikara, who grew corn, beans, and squash; next came nomadic bison-hunting Sioux. After a treaty was signed with the Sioux, pioneer farmers established the town of Sioux Falls in 1857.

The Old Courthouse Museum and the Pettigrew Home and Museum (the latter located at Eighth Street and Duluth Avenue) are collectively known as the Siouxland Heritage Museums, which has a website of the same name (no spaces). The latter facility once belonged to Richard Pettigrew, one of South Dakota's first senators. Selected in 1889, this surveyor, lawyer, and businessman traveled around the world gathering artifacts and rocks and adding to his collection of mounted animals. To showcase his treasures, Pettigrew built a museum which was constructed primarily of petrified wood from Arizona. The facility adjoined his home, which, like the Old Courthouse, was made of Sioux quartzite.

Surrounding the Pettigrew Home and Museum is a historic district that spans a 14-b block area and contains homes that were constructed between 1872 and 1925. The entire district is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Junius Fishburne, a state historic preservation officer, said the district is “one of the outstanding cultural resources in South Dakota.”

Visitors can pick up a mapped guide to the district at either museum and then drive or walk past homes that boast such architectural styles as Queen Anne, neocolonial, Gothic and Tudor. St. Joseph's cathedral, featuring a blend of Romanesque and French Renaissance architecture, serves as the focal point of the district.

Completing our circular tour around Sioux Falls, you should know that balloons hold a great deal of interest locally. And we're not talking about party balloons, because Aerostar International, a subsidiary of Raven Industries Incorporated, manufactures all kinds of industrial scale inflatables at the Sioux Falls airport, north of the historic district. This company provides balloons for sporting, scientific, and commercial purposes, including the ones that are featured in Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Kenny Anderson Park, at the eastern end of Sioux Falls, hosts the Great Plains Balloon Race in August, weather permitting.

For a taste of regional history, you may want to travel north from Sioux Falls to Prairie Village, located outside the town of Madison. This privately run village comprises a collection of restored turn-of-the-century buildings, as well as an 1893 steam carousel, farm machinery, antique automobiles, and old rail cars. The buildings were moved to the site from nearby towns. One of the structures, an opera house came here from Oldham, South Dakota, where orchestra leader Lawrence Welk made his stage debut in 1924. Theatrical productions are still stagnated there during the summer, and an annual festival known as the Threshold Jamboree fills the village during the last weekend in August. Prairie Village is located near Lake Herman State Park, where camping and boating can be enjoyed. Prairie Village offers camping from May to Labor Day with over 300 electrical sites.

Visitors will discover that the Sioux quartzite found in Falls Park also occurs in other areas near Sioux Falls. Northeast of the city, 14 miles north of Interstate 90 off of State Route 11, the pink rock forms towering cliffs over Split Rock Creek in Palisades State Park. This park contains camping, picnicking, and fishing facilities.

The nearby town of Garretson maintains its own special place in history. The notorious outlaw Jesse James reportedly robbed the bank in Northfield, Minnesota and hid in a cave near what is now Garretson's Split Rock Municipal Park. As James set out again, a posse appeared right behind him, forcing the outlaw to jump across a quartzite chasm called Devil's Gulch. A footbridge now spans the precipice.

The Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Data Center is located near Garretson on County Road 118. The center, which is administrated by the US Geological Survey, is an archive and research facility dedicated to the study of satellite and aerial photographs, provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The center's lobby contains several displays of note, including one showing aerial photographs of Sioux Falls from 1937 on; another that consist of video programs; and a rotating Earth that's nearly a story high.

Farther northeast on Minnesota State Route 23, the quartzite appears again at Pipestone National Monument in Pipestone, Minnesota. Indigenous people quarried beneath the quartzite to reach the soapstone below it, which they used in the bowls of their ceremonial pipes. The soapstone was dubbed “catlinite” after George Catlin, a famous 19th-century artist who was the first white man to describe the quarries. Native Americans still dig for the brittle catlinite by hand, because heavy machinery would shatter it. Visitors can observe this mining process at several active pits that are located on the grounds. In case they want to take a specimen home, the gift shop in the monument's visitor center contains pipes and other items made from catlinite.

The monument's self-guided circle trail provides an introduction to the area's natural history. For instance, millions of years ago, this part of Minnesota and neighboring South Dakota were part of a seashore. Deposits of muddy clay were covered over with sand that was “contaminated” by iron minerals. Geologic pressure and heat historically transformed the clay into catlinite and the iron-filled sand developed into quartzite – the pink rock of Sioux Falls.

For additional information concerning attractions or campgrounds contact the following sources:

South Dakota Division of Tourisz
Capitol Lake Plaza, Box 1000
Pierre, SD 57501
(800) 843-1930 outside South Dakota
(800) 952-2217 in South Dakota

Sioux Falls Area Chamber of Commerce
PO Box 1425
Sioux Falls, SD 57101
(605) 336-1620

City of Sioux Falls website: http://www.siouxfalls.org

Old Courthouse Museum and Pettigrew Home and Museum, 200 W 6th St, Sioux Falls, SD 57104 (605)367-4210

Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) https://eros.usgs.gov

Madison Chamber of Commerce
PO Box 467
Madison, SD 57042
(605) 256-2454

Pipestone National Monument
PO Box 727
Pipestone, MN 56164
(507) 825-5463

Pipestone Chamber of Commerce
117 8th Avenue SE
Pipestone, MN 56164
(507) 825-3316

The Museums of Dubai

The Dubai Museum Located in the most ancient building of the city, the Al Fahidy Fortress, established in 1787, the Dubai Museum is one of the most notable in the city. The fortress served as the residence of the governor of the city as well during many periods of history. Today, the museum takes visitors…

The Dubai Museum

Located in the most ancient building of the city, the Al Fahidy Fortress, established in 1787, the Dubai Museum is one of the most notable in the city. The fortress served as the residence of the governor of the city as well during many periods of history. Today, the museum takes visitors coming from various places around the world to spend their holidays in Dubai to a journey to watch the history of Islamic schools and a live demonstration of the traditional crafts of the country.

The museum opens from 8:30 in the morning until 8:30 in the evening (Saturday to Thursday)

Friday from 2 at noon until 8:30 in the evening.

The Camels' House

This museum is dedicated to the significant role camels played in the lives of Arabs through history. The Camel's House consists mainly of a wide-open courtyard that was used as a stable for camels. The museum now has many sections illustrating this strong relationship between humans and camels especially in the Arabian Peninsula. A large number of tourists who travel to Dubai love to explore such museums.

The Museum opens from 8 in the morning until 2 at noon from Sunday to Thursday.

The Coffee Museum

This museum is dedicated to coffee lovers coming from all over the globe to enjoy a vacation in Dubai. It illustrated the history of coffee and the different approaches of its production. The Coffee Museum shows the specific and dissimilar tools used to produce coffee. Off course, after their tour of the museum, guests can enjoy the best coffee in the world in the cafe of the museum.

The museum opens from 9 in the morning until 5 in the afternoon (Saturday to Thursday)

The Heritage Village

This magnificent museum hosts several traditional Arabian craftsmen including weavers, potters, and tent makers. The Heritage Village focuses on the people who used to live in Dubai and work in or around the sea. This includes sailors who used to search for fish and pearls as the museums interestingly shows statistics that demonstrates the production of pearls in the country. There is also the Tents' Village that tells the whole story of the Bedouin life in the region. The Heritage Museum is quite popular among tourists who spend their holidays in Dubai.

The Museum opens from 8 in the morning until 8 in the evening every day except Friday.

The Museum of Traditional Architecture

One of the most interesting museums that welcome many tourists who travel to Dubai is the Museum of Traditional Architecture. Located in the former residence of El Sheikh Gomaa Ibn El Maktoom, the museum illustrates the history of the architecture in Dubai, the means of construction, and the tools used in the building of traditional houses in Dubai. The museum as well hosts a section dedicated to the history and the people of Dubai.

The museum opens from 8 in the morning until 2 at noon from Sunday until Thursday.

Summer Festival in 2017: Mount Abu, Rajasthan

Mount Abu is a very popular hill station nestled in the Aravalli ranges in Sirohi district of Rajasthan, at an approximate elevation of 1,220 meters above the sea level, the highest being 'Guru Shikhar' which reaches a height of 1,722 meters. A leisure destination for many, Mount Abu in Rajasthan is nothing less than a…

Mount Abu is a very popular hill station nestled in the Aravalli ranges in Sirohi district of Rajasthan, at an approximate elevation of 1,220 meters above the sea level, the highest being 'Guru Shikhar' which reaches a height of 1,722 meters.

A leisure destination for many, Mount Abu in Rajasthan is nothing less than a divine retreat for the folks at Rajasthan and Gujarat, providing them abatement from the other harsh climate and scorching desert heat.

At a modest height, the only hill station in Rajasthan is often referred to as 'an oasis in the desert' and is home to a number of waterfalls, lakes and rivulets, and the whole neighborhood is encapsulated by greenery.

Mount Abu is an eclectic mix of experiences quite unlike anywhere else in Rajasthan; providing a stark contrast to the parched state, more than 60% of which is desert.

Come the month of May, when the rough summer beats down on the royal state of Rajasthan, the only hill station in state gets soaked in festivity and comes alive. It celebrates a 2 day long festival in the month of May which goes by the name of Summer Festival and is held every year, concluding at the day of Buddha Poornima.

Bestowed with steep rocks and pristine lakes, Mount Abu celebrates the Summer Festival, which is a feat of classical music, folk and Rajasthani heritage and culture, proffering rich knowledge about the state's heroic past and its tribal life and forgotten way of living. It's unduly one of the most popular and viable festivals in the entire state.

Organized by Rajasthan Tourism every year in the Hindu month of Ashadh, Summer Festival in Mt. Abu kicks off with soulful ballad songs and tranquilizing folk dances of Gair (a Rajasthani folk dance mostly performed by the Bhil community), Ghoomar (a folk dance performed by veiled women of Bhil tribe) and Daph (a folk act tracing its origins back to Haryana, performed to exhibit joy).

Then begins a traditional procession; concluding at the RTDC Hotel Shikhar, the procession then gathers near the Nakki Lake where the spectators are valued to folk songs and dance performances of Rajasthan and Gujarat.

The second day brings together an array of activities, cultural programs and events, and competitions like horse racing, skating, 'matka' races, tug of war, CRPF band show, and the most famous of all, the boat race at the Nakki Lake . The highlight of the first day, however, is the Shaam-e-Qawwali, featuring some of the best Indian folk and Qawwali singers. It's a much anticipated event, the end of which is marked by a spectacular display of glittering fireworks across the hill station, catching the fancy of every tourist.

This year, the festival will be held on the 9th and 10th day of May. Go, witness the magnificent harmony of colors and love and spend a lovely vacation at the hill station of Mount Abu.

Myanmar: Major Travel Destinations And Guide

Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, is a land of faith, traditional practices and centuries-old stupas. The republic in South-East Asia is bounded by India, China, Bangladesh, Laos and Cambodia and covers an area of ​​676,578 square kilometers. Myanmar has a registered population of 51 million (as of 2014). After lying at the crossroads of 2…

Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, is a land of faith, traditional practices and centuries-old stupas. The republic in South-East Asia is bounded by India, China, Bangladesh, Laos and Cambodia and covers an area of ​​676,578 square kilometers. Myanmar has a registered population of 51 million (as of 2014).

After lying at the crossroads of 2 of the world's greatest civilizations, India and China, Myanmar's culture is not directly influenced by either of them and is a pleasant orchestration of both, weaved into Myanmar's native characteristics.

Known for their hospitality and benevolence, the folks and the life in Myanmar are greatly influenced by Buddhism, and have been content and enthusiastic even in the face of many adversities.

How to prepare for a trip to Myanmar?

1. Visa: Anyone with a passport from Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, Brunei and Vietnam can enter the country for at most 14 days. If that's not the case, you need to apply for a Myanmar tourist visa.

2. Currency: Known as Kyat, it's fairly easy to exchange foreign currency at airports, hotels, Forex and banks. Also, foreign treaties above 2000 USD must be declared to the customs at the airport in place of which the government issues Foreign Exchange Certificates, which are accepted by restaurants, travel agents, taxis, hotels, airlines, etc.

3. Vaccinations: Myanmar's Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone arriving at the country to get vaccinated for chickenpox, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis, flu and typhoid.

4. Choose a season: The period between February and May is warm with little to no rainfall. The country transforms to a lush land between the months of May and October with rains pouring through afternoon and evenings. October to February is the festive season and also the best time to visit the country.

Top Destinations

With whimsical mountains to exotic, white-sand beaches, and with lush landscapes dotted with pagodas and a thriving nightlife, Myanmar has everything a traveler needs.

Yangon

Yangon served as the capital of Myanmar until 2006. It's one of the most important cities with most tourists beginning or ending their journey to Myanmar here.

Major attractions in the city are:

  • Shwedagon Pagoda
  • Bogyoke Aung Market
  • Kandawgyi Lake
  • City's walking tour

Bagan and Central Myanmar

It's an ancient temple-city, which once was a site painted with more than 10,000 temples, monasteries and pagodas, of which only over 2,200 remains.

Major attractions in the city are:

  • Hot-air balloon ride
  • Boat cruise at Irrawaddy river
  • Lacquerware workshops
  • Shwesandaw and Shwegugyi Temples
  • Mount Popa

Beach escapes

Almost around one third of Myanmar's perimeter forms an uninterrupted coastline of almost 2,000 kilometers running along Andaman Sea and Bay of Bengal. Myanmar is home to one of the most spectacular beaches in the world.

Major beaches in the country:

  • Ngapali Beach in Rakhine state
  • Chaung Thar in Irrawaddy region
  • Myeik North and Myeik South
  • Ngwe Saung (4 hour drive from Yangon)

5 Things To Do in Red River If You’re Not Into Sports

Mountain vacations draw many types of vacationers from naturalists to sports enthusiasts of all kinds. Most mountain destinations are known for skiing, snow boarding, x-games, and more. However, not everyone chooses a mountain vacation destination for the purposes of playing sports. Some simply enjoy the fresh air, nature, panoramic vistas, and peace and quiet while…

Mountain vacations draw many types of vacationers from naturalists to sports enthusiasts of all kinds. Most mountain destinations are known for skiing, snow boarding, x-games, and more. However, not everyone chooses a mountain vacation destination for the purposes of playing sports. Some simply enjoy the fresh air, nature, panoramic vistas, and peace and quiet while others want to mingle with locals and enjoy fine dining and night life. There are plenty of activities to engage in either way. Here are 5 things to do in Red River New Mexico if you're not into sports.

1. Shopping

If you are someone who enjoys shopping but is tired of going to the same old chain stores that offer the very same items you can buy anywhere else, then you will love shopping in this mountain destination. There are stores for art, books, candy and confections, and even places to purchase great cards and stationary. For some more popular stores look at Calamity Jane's and The Candy Crate.

2. Special events

Participating in events is a great way to enjoy yourself while engaging with the community you are visiting. Some popular events are the Enchanted Circle Century Bike Tour which is a 100- mile bike ride taking riders around the Enchanted Circle, a difficult track that circles through other small towns before returning. If you're not much of a biker either but prefer to mingle, Oktoberfest at Bradenburg park hosts many micro-breweries for a fun German themed festival filled with beer and activities.

3. Dining

Enjoy the simple pleasures in life and try some delicious food during your mountain vacation. From Pizzerias to Texas themed steakhouses, this town has everything you could ask for. Tourists especially love Shotgun Willie's for quick and delicious American food as well as Texas Red's Steakhouse and Saloon, for a taste of how the Texan neighbors like to dine.

4. Nightlife

Whatever you want to dance, see live music, have a few night caps before bed or do all three, there is a place for you. Locals tend to go to Bull O 'The Woods Saloon to throw some back, or head back to Texas Red's steakhouse in the evening for some live music and dancing.

5. Staying in

Who says you need to go out anyways? One of the best parts about a vacation is the rest and relaxation that comes from comfortable lodging and a good book or tv show. Choose a great vacation rental and stay home for a few nights enjoying the peace and quiet and re-charging your batteries. Bring a good book or rent some movies you've been meaning to watch and get thought up on your entertainment to-do lists.

With so many activities to engage in, you do not have to enjoy sports to visit a mountain town.

What Kind of Weather Should You Expect When You Visit A Mountain Town?

When going on any vacation it is important to be prepared with the right clothing. This is especially true if you plan on taking a nice vacation up in the mountains. The higher above sea level you go, the more likely it is for the weather to swing wild from sunny and hot to dreary…

When going on any vacation it is important to be prepared with the right clothing. This is especially true if you plan on taking a nice vacation up in the mountains. The higher above sea level you go, the more likely it is for the weather to swing wild from sunny and hot to dreary and cold. Even with wide ranged weather, mountain vacations are highly enjoyable and fun for couples and families alike. What kind of weather should you expect when you visit a mountain town and how can you be better prepared? Read on for some helpful tips.

1. Wider range of temperatures

Depending on the season, what how high in elevation your lodging is at, and what side of a mountain you are on, the weather can vary substantially. In general, mountain weather can be sunny and hot and then suddenly breezy, cold, and wet. This happens because of the elevation and the high peaks blocking humidity from the clouds. The higher the elevation, the lower the temperatures. Lower temperatures cause clouds to hold less moisture and so precipitation is more likely.

2. Wear water resistant clothing on hikes

Hiking is one of mountain enthusiasts' favorite activities. The trails you find in mountain destinations are filled with trails that range from mild to wild. You may embark on a long multi-mile hike with warm weather and sunny weather overhead, but before you are even half of the way through, things could change drastically. It is very helpful to bring backpacks that are water resistant or water proof as well as umbrellas or rain jackets in case the weather suddenly takes a change towards precipitation and lower temperatures.

3. Pack layers

Make sure you pack in layers for your mountain vacation. Bring extra pairs of socks, long sleeved shirts, and pants as well as shorts and tank tops. As mentioned before, what appears to be sunny and warm weather perfect for a pool could quickly become chilly with some increase in elevation or if a storm rolls in. Be ready by bringing clothes that can be worn over each other in layers. This way you can wear outfits that allow you to change easily without having to return to your lodging and change outfits completely.

Be ready for all sorts of weather on your mountain vacation. Pack the right clothing so you can enjoy the sunny days and warmth of the sun while hiking, but be prepared incase you get hit with a storm or rainy weather while in the middle of your long afternoon hike. Being prepared can make all the difference in how much you and your loved ones enjoy themselves.

Taroudant in Morocco

Taroudant is one of the most ancient cities of Morocco. Situated in central Morocco less than 100 kilometers away from Aghadir, the city was established during the ruling period of the Phoenicians, as it was an important commercial hub. Taroudant also flourished during the Almoravid and Almohad periods as a significant military base. Today, Taroudant…

Taroudant is one of the most ancient cities of Morocco. Situated in central Morocco less than 100 kilometers away from Aghadir, the city was established during the ruling period of the Phoenicians, as it was an important commercial hub.

Taroudant also flourished during the Almoravid and Almohad periods as a significant military base. Today, Taroudant hosts several tourists who travel to Morocco for its wonderful desert ambience and its noticeable fortified walls.

The city has witnessed memorable declination during the reign of the Marinids for quite a considerable period. However, at the beginning of the 16th century, with the emergence of the Saadis dynasty it regained its strategic and commercial role. This development should be mainly attributed to Sultan Mohamed El Sheikh; the Sultan of the Marinids at the time as he restored the walls of the city, constructed a Kasbah, a mosque, and a number of schools. Travel packages to Morocco that include a visit to Taroudant include several visits to these monuments.

Once again, with the decline of the Marinids during the 17th century, the role of Taroudant partially declined before the Alewives took control of the country. With the death of Mawlai Ismail, the whole area, Sousa, where the city is located went out of the central control of the kingdom. Afterwards, with a resolution between this strategic region and the Alawites kings at the beginning of the 18th century, the town was able to have a significant role it played for centuries. Taroudant also became one of the popular tourist destinations where vacationers explore during their tour in Morocco.

Perhaps the most interesting monument of Taroudant is the fortified walls of the city. With a length of more than 7 kilometers, with 130 monitoring towers, 9 fortresses, and five original gates, the walls of the city is one of the most impressive historical sites visited by many tourists who travel to Morocco.

The idea of ​​establishing fortified walls for Taroudant goes back to the period of Almoravid around the 12th century. However, historical records assert that the walls tourists who visit Morocco from around the world explore today date back to the 16th century when Taroudant became an important stronghold for the armies of Al Saadis dynasty to attack the Spanish and Portuguese troops that occupied several areas of the Moroccan coasts.

During the 16th century, Mohamed El Sheikh El Saadi restored and renovated the walls to have a width that ranges from 1.5 to 4 meters. He also established the Sultan Kasbah that occupied a surface area of ​​more than 50,000 square meters. The lack of rocks in the area forced his men to mix limestone with sand to be used in the constructions of many parts of the walls. Today, the walls of Taroudant are still quite impressive and grab the attention of tourists who travel to Morocco.

During the 17th century, Taroudant witnessed a sever attack by the Berbers of the Moroccan desert. However, the fortified walls played a major role in defending the city. The walls are in fact considered a remarkable historical military construction that is featured with power and accuracy. Considered the most significant landmark of Taroudant and the whole region, many tourists who spend a wonderful vacation in Morocco would normally explore parts of the walls.

Himachal Pradesh Travel And Tourism: Places To Visit

Himachal Pradesh, popularly known as Devbhumi, or Land of the Gods, is one of the most popular hill states in India, which is nestled in the north-western region of the western Himalayas. Himachal Pradesh is landlocked with the Jammu and Kashmir to the north, Punjab to the west, and Tibetan plateau to the east, Uttarakhand…

Himachal Pradesh, popularly known as Devbhumi, or Land of the Gods, is one of the most popular hill states in India, which is nestled in the north-western region of the western Himalayas. Himachal Pradesh is landlocked with the Jammu and Kashmir to the north, Punjab to the west, and Tibetan plateau to the east, Uttarakhand on the south-east and Haryana on the south-west.

The name Himachal was coined by Acharya Diwakar Datt Sharma, who was the state's one of the most eminent Sanskrit scholar. The name comes from 'Him' and 'Anchal' in Sanskrit, meaning snow and mountain respectively.

Since the land's inception, Himachal Pradesh has been associated with numerous civilizations. Starting about about 2 million years ago, when primitive humans roamed the foothills of Kangra, Nalagarh and Sirmour to Indus Valley Civilization that flourished up to 1750 BC, Himachal Pradesh has always been an sustainable abode of simplicity nurturing lives.

Until the 19th century, tourism within the state was limited only to certain pilgrimages to a chosen few destinations. With the advent of the British and post independence infrastructure development, Himachal tourism saw an increase in tourism. But, it was only during the late 1980's that the tourism sector saw a tremendous boost.

From lofty, snow-clad peaks and high-altitude, holy lakes to natural Sulfur hot springs and fast flowing rivers plunging through valleys endowing life through their courses, Himachal Pradesh is a reservoir of natural riches.

Popular Destinations

1. Shimla: Shimla is the ever-charming hill station often referred to as the queen of the hills and is known for its distinctive architecture.

Things to see:

  • Mall Road
  • Ridge
  • Jakhoo Temple
  • Christ Church

2. Manali: With its breathtaking landscape and the Beas River sauntering through the town, Manali is the place where mankind is believed to have started.

Things to see:

  • Rohtang Pass (3979 meters above sea level)
  • Solang valley
  • Rahala Waterfall
  • Hot water springs in Vashisht

3. Dharamshala: The hill station lying on the foothills of Dhauladhar Range was recently declared the second capital of the Himachal Pradesh.

Things to see:

  • Kareri Lake
  • St. John's Church
  • Baijnath Temple
  • Kotla Fort

4. Lahaul and Spiti: Strange, exciting and primitive, the rugged region lies at an average elevation of about 3,000 meters ad is known for its rocky escapements and splendorous peaks.

Things to see:

  • Pin Valley National Park
  • Ki Monastery
  • Chander Tal (Lake)
  • Kaza
  • Kunzum Pass (4590 meters above sea level)

5. Kinnaur: Previously hidden from the rest of the world, with entry restricted to only a few, Kinnaur valley can be accessed only through high Himalayan passes that remains closed for a major part of the year.

Things to see:

  • Sangla Valley
  • Kothi
  • Morang

6. Nahan: Lying on an isolated ridge on the Shivalik range, Nahan is a picturesque town whose origin is often associated with saints and princes.

Things to see:

  • Habban Valley
  • Rajgarh
  • Churdhar Peak
  • Suketi Fossil Park

Bhutan Tourist Destinations And Travel Guide

Locally known as Druk-yul or Druk Tsendhen, ie land of the thunder dragons, Bhutan is a treasure house of Buddhist art and the last Himalayan kingdom, which is still shrouded in Buddhism, magic and mystery. Bordered by India and China in the south and north respectively, Bhutan is landlocked country and the smallest kingdom that's…

Locally known as Druk-yul or Druk Tsendhen, ie land of the thunder dragons, Bhutan is a treasure house of Buddhist art and the last Himalayan kingdom, which is still shrouded in Buddhism, magic and mystery.

Bordered by India and China in the south and north respectively, Bhutan is landlocked country and the smallest kingdom that's anchored entirely within the Himalayas.

Interestingly, Bhutan has successfully endured its independence for centuries and is one of the few countries in the world that has not been colonized in its history.

Besides its magnificent natural beauty, Bhutan also possesses a strong sense of culture which binds the country together and is a major factor which distinguishes it from its neighbors.

Travel Requirements

1. Visa: Except for the citizens of India, Bangladesh and Maldives, everyone entering the country must obtain a visa before arriving, which is processed through an online system by licensed Bhutan tour operators (local and their international partners). There's no need to visit the Bhutanese embassy in your country.

2. Advance Payment: A trip to Bhutan requires your trip to be paid in full and wired to the Tourism Council of Bhutan. It's only after the payment that the Visa will be issued / cleared.

3. High Value Low Impact tourism: A minimum daily package is required for tourists as per the policy framed by the Tourism Council of Bhutan. It includes the following services:

  • 3 star accommodation
  • 3 meals
  • Licensed tour guide
  • Camping equipment
  • Internal transport

For tourists entering the country in a group of 3 or more, the following rates are applicable:

  • 200 USD / person / night in the months of January, February, June, July, August and December
  • 250 USD / person / night for rest of the year

Perched high on the Himalayas, Bhutan can be divided geographically into 3 regions, specifically Western Bhutan, Eastern Bhutan and Central Bhutan.

Western Bhutan

Comprising of 6 districts, the western circuit of Bhutan lets you attend the summer festival of Haa and dive deep into the ancient culture of Haa people, and visit numerous temples, museums, and dzongs at Thimpu along with the newly introduced Takin festival.

Places to Visit

  • Paro
  • Thimphu
  • Haa
  • Punakha
  • Laya Village

Eastern Bhutan

Easily one of the least explored parts of the kingdom of Bhutan; this is an ideal expanse for adventure enthusiasts and washed in virgin beauty consisting of lofty peaks and verdant forest trails.

Places to Visit

  • Mongar
  • Lhuntse
  • Trashiyangtse
  • Trashigang

Central Bhutan

Providing rich insights into the country's political history, this place is particularly famous among the history buffs for its eminent religious and historic sites along with monasteries and temples. Moreover, with its wide running subtropical and alpine zones, the region is also blessed with pristine beauty.

Places to Visit

  • Jakar
  • Bumthang
  • Gelephu
  • Trongsa
  • Burning Lake

Enjoy Outdoor Family Camping and Hiking in Texas State Parks

The State of Texas is a big place with many options for great camping, hiking, and outdoor adventures. Taking time to get the kids outdoor creates many fond memories for a lifetime, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department provides ample opportunities through the state park campgrounds where camping is definitely kid friendly. We were…

The State of Texas is a big place with many options for great camping, hiking, and outdoor adventures. Taking time to get the kids outdoor creates many fond memories for a lifetime, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department provides ample opportunities through the state park campgrounds where camping is definitely kid friendly.

We were able to experience several state park camping trips when our kids were young, and we did have some great adventures. We visited several parks at some of the best lakes as well as some in the mountains of West Texas. We saw everything from hot, sultry hiking excursions to giant walking sticks to unexpected snow storms. We were usually with a group, so there were always some great meals around the campfire, the incidental injury or mishap, tall tales, and lasting friendships. Some of our favorite parks were Davis Mountains, Inks Lake, and Garner State Parks.

Davis Mountains State Park is nestled at the foot of the Davis Mountains (yes, there are mountains in Texas) and offers an abundance of campsites for tent or RV campers. Neighboring Fort Davis partnerships many types of tourists, including motorcycle enthusiasts, star gazers, history buffs, and outdoorsmen. The old fort is a National Historic Site that captures the history of the Indian Wars during the late 1800's. You can also venture a few miles up the road and participate in a Star Party at McDonald Observatory. While you're waiting for the night sky, there are numerous hiking trails to experience with some wonderful views. There are so many outdoor adventures for kids, you will have to come back several times to experience it all.

Inks Lake State Park is located in Central Texas along a chain of lakes along the Colorado River. The lake boasts some clear blue water, beautiful rock outcrops, and shady oak forests making for a great setting for weekend camping. There are several hiking and backpacking trails, and the lake provides a wonderful place to canoe, boat, water ski, kayak, and swim. You can find some of the best sunsets and many great memories can be made here. This is another family camping location that will require more than one visit.

Garner State Park is located in South-Central Texas along the Frio River. Driving to Garner from the north you would think you're going to a desert campground, but not too far south of Interstate 10 you find yourself in a magical, mountainous wonderland with some of the best views in the state. The park provides an abundance of campsites as well as some cabins for rent. The kids will enjoy the Frio for swimming, rope swings, or just lazily floating in a tube. There are also a few places for the daredevil in your group to do some cliff diving. For kid friendly camping and great family adventures, Garner State Park will not disappoint.

These are just a few highlights from the numerous state parks in Texas. The state park campgrounds are well-maintained, family friendly, and will provide some great adventures that your kids will remember for a lifetime.